Your New Sugar Alternative Can Do What?!? The Top Benefits of Allulose

Benefits of Allulose

Allulose is the rare sugar that we introduced you to a few weeks ago.  If you haven’t read it yet, take a minute to check out the article we wrote that goes over what exactly allulose is and where it’s found in nature: Allulose: Fad Sweetener or the Real Deal.

Now that we know it isn’t just some short-lived diet fad, we can take a deeper dive into the science-backed benefits of this low-cal sucrose (table sugar) replacement. Here are three awesome benefits of allulose.

1. Contributes to Weight Loss

Being that allulose is relatively new in commercial use, human studies with allulose are just starting to become more frequent, but they are looking incredibly promising.

Studies on animals have shown that allulose reduces fat accumulation. When compared to other sweeteners, these studies have proven that the allulose group had significantly lower abdominal fat when each group was given the same food.1

Since allulose has been so effective in rats, more and more human studies are being conducted.

One of the biggest studies was done on 121 Korean subjects (aged 20-40 years). They were able to show that allulose reduces body fat mass in overweight or obese subjects.

The subjects were divided into three groups. One group received a placebo, the second received a low dose of allulose (4 g × 2 times/day), and the third received a high dose of allulose (7 g × 2 times/day).

The subjects did not change any eating or activity habits. The only difference was in the amount of allulose they consumed.

Surprisingly, over the course of 12 weeks, both groups consuming allulose lost body fat. And, the high dose allulose subjects lost “significant body fat” when compared to the control group.2

2. Curbs Appetite

Studies have demonstrated that allulose has the potential to curb appetite. In one specific study done with 34 subjects over 12-weeks, the group consuming allulose had a significant increase in leptin levels.

Leptin, made by fat cells, is an appetite-suppressing hormone that increases energy metabolism. In addition, this study conclusively suggested that this rare sugar is a safe sweetener.3

While more studies are needed, it’s looking obvious that allulose should be your top choice of sweetener if you’re looking to shed a few pounds.

3. Controls Blood Sugar

The benefits of allulose extend beyond just weight loss. Allulose has zero impact on the levels on blood glucose, but has actually been shown to suppress the elevation of blood glucose concentration after eating. In a study of 20 healthy adults, it displayed no impacts on blood glucose or insulin concentration; it only decreases glycemic responses.4

In another study with 26 subjects, some of which were borderline diabetic, those that consumed allulose with their meal had significantly lower blood glucose levels 60 minutes afterward.

In addition, this study showed that their were no abnormal effects nor clinical issues caused by ingesting allulose in the long term.5

These studies, and many others, have shown that allulose is good news for those with diabetes or those that are watching their blood sugar levels!

The awesome benefits of allulose are what make it the optimum choice for those concerned about the negative effects of sugar in their diet.

MariGold’s Fat Bombs utilize allulose in their formulations.  Be on the lookout as MariGold releases more products made with non-GMO allulose in the near future!

1. Dietary D-psicose, a C-3 epimer of D-fructose, suppresses the activity of hepatic lipogenic enzymes in rats
2. A Preliminary Study for Evaluating the Dose-Dependent Effect of d-Allulose for Fat Mass Reduction in Adult Humans: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial
3. Weight reducing effect and safety evaluation of rare sugar syrup by a randomized double-blind, parallel-group study in humans
4. Acute D-psicose administration decreases the glycemic responses to an oral maltodextrin tolerance test in normal adults
5. Study on the postprandial blood glucose suppression effect of D-psicose in borderline diabetes and the safety of long-term ingestion by normal human subjects

Comments

    • Mari Ann Lisenbe

      Hello Caroline,
      We are not using allulose in our low FODMAP products. We are awaiting word from Monash University as to whether it can be considered low FODMAP or not.

      Thanks!

  1. Kristi Peterson

    I for one would love to try a protein bar sweetened with allulose, preferably one that is free of lectins. I think there are a lot like me who would at least like to try! I use your lectin free bars on a regular basis, but notice on the days I eat them that it is a bit more of a challenge to curb my desire to overeat. The added benefit of curbing appetite and controlling blood sugar in addition to weight loss.. well, that sounds like a downright godsend! I know it’s expensive to add a line, but if you do, I’m all in! With the rest of my eating choices I can’t justify the fat bombs. A big protein hit is a must, at least for me. Thanks!!

  2. RyansMom

    I echo BG’s comment—those of us with IBS who need to follow the low-FODMAP diet will not be able to order your bars any more if you use this in place of stevia as a sweetener. It’s so hard to find options that we can eat to start with—please don’t take away this choice!

  3. Please don’t replace the stevia in your bars with this!! Many of us that have digestive issues have distress with sweeteners that end in -ose. Please leave us the stevia option

  4. Judith Allen

    Oh gosh, I’m suspicious of any sugar, and any substance with”ose ” on the end of the word. I encourage you to continue to offer products sweetened with stevia and/or monk fruit. I trust the plant based sweeteners more.

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